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at the conclusion. when general andrew jackson achieved this spectacular triumph in new orleans. as we will see the language of love proves pivotal to the public's narration of these events. win or lose, americans found their imagination captured whenever battle sagas were replayed as love stories. no matter how dire the events of the day, pro-war commentators could always be counted on to put a romantic gloss on public adaption. the war of 1812 provided an ideal moment for americans from anonymous unknowns like the author of that soldier sally to leading nationalist to mold the meaning of love of country. war supporters worked to portray the conflict is a romantic adventure, one in which dashing young men went to war and won the hearts of patriotic maidens, and one in which the thrill of romantic love contributed directly to the low of victory. now before i take you on an unconventional chronology of the war i do want to first pause to take a careful look at contemporary theory of political economy. you are going to have to bear with me for 10 minutes or so and i promise we will get back to so
announced she is not going to campaign in 2012 for barack obama. >> host: the role of jesse jackson in president president s early political career. >> guest: that's very up known. i was very fortunate in being able to find about that. jesse jackson is still a highly regarded figure in the african-american community in chicago. and when obama started running for the u.s. senate, he was advised to go to jackson and get some help from jackson regarding foreign policy issues, domestic policy issues, but even more important, his speaking -- his oratory needed some work and they thought jesse could help him. and jackson agreed to do so. and every saturday for a whole year, barack obama was invited to the push rainbow meeting that jackson held, where jackson worked with obama on his oratory and his delivery of speeches, and he improved tremendously. guess what? since he was elected president, president barack obama has not invited jesse jackson to the white house once. he is totally, completely cut himself off from jesse jackson. no one seems to know exactly why, except that it appears th
to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to the supreme court justice, robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with the conservatism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a -- was, i think, a seen by then, even, as a great justice, and he had been the prosecutor at the numberberg war trials, took time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and then game back to the court. rehnquist graduates from stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was actually in the class that would have ended a semester later. he finishedded the work, so smart, got out early, and so he wanted to -- it was clear when i was researching through the papers and looking at the diary ies that were on deposit with the papers, fascinating, had six notebooks that were filled with rem innocences, -- memories, and desires, and memoirs, and one of the things that was clear is he really saw himself destined for some important job. he, actually, on the court probably or certainly somewhere in government because he
hampton, stonewall jackson is a west pointer, two-thirds of major generals involved, are veterans at least of the regular army, and the regular army really is dominated by west point. west point is about -- it's not only that most officers in the regular army are graduated of west point. it's kind of the focal point of much of the armies professionalism. so when they do for example, review boards for things like new tactics they'll use the cadet as guinea pigs and have them march around and use thest point library. they have a -- the only historical library available where this stuff is at. but if we think of the big three, lee, grant, sherman, stonewall jackson, longstreet, all west pointers and all have gone through that experience. >> host: when it comes down to the civil war you have generals on the south, generals on the north who have been train in the same ways. what does that do to some of the conflicts? >> guest: for me the most important thing that happens -- the most important end result of that is that the wars are fighting clones of each other because their leadership models,
madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, rall reagan and bill clinton. lincoln has a special case in the successful second term. it's interesting to note that only the president had a more successful second term than the first or james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president elected to the second term and the reason for those are the trouble second term. member for field because of the war that seemed on winnable or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also failed because of economic crisis or the failure to act to detour such a crisis and these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt with a 37 downturn and george bush to eight failed due to their inability to leave with jefferson, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. they failed to to franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four of them did not effectively communicate this agenda or initiative were jefferson, monroe, grant and cleveland. obviously the dominant source of failure for the second term prudent has been their in
quincy adams versus andrew jackson. andrew jackson was accused of being an adulterer and big mist because of a quirk in his divorce proceedings of his wife, rachel, from her first marriage. but something that was circulated around the whole country, called the coffin hand bill. it was a pamphlet, that was posted throughout the country, showing coffins. these were the men that andrew jackson had supposedly kill, either as a general or ordering the execution or through duels. so being called a big amist and an adult tress and a murder, is what was going on. we like to think about gentlemen and powdered wigs but politics has always been a nasty business and a sharp knife business from the beginning. >> host: how has the power of the presidency changed over 44 different presidents? >> guest: well, you know, sent out in don't know much about american presidents to set out why the with ha president. 225 years ago we just celebrated constitution day a few months ago -- celebrating the adoption of the constitution as it was written in philadelphia before it was ratified, and one of the things the
, another tremendous example of a vicious, vicious election. john quincy adams versus andrew jackson. andrew jackson was accused of being an adulterer and bigamist because of a cork in the divorce proceedings of his wife, rachel from her first marriage. this something that was circulated around the whole country called the handbill was a pamphlet that was posted throughout the country, showing the coffins. these are the man andrew jackson had supposedly killed, either as a general or ordering the execution. so being caught a bigamist, an adulterer and murderer and having them spread around the country widely wasn't that unusual. we like to think the good old days in powdered weeks. politics have always been a nasty business and it's always been a sharp knife business in the very beginning of presidential politics. >> host: is the power of the presidency changed over 44 different president? >> guest: well, i started out in "don't know much about the american presidents" to look at the very, very basic question of why we have a president. 225 years ago we just celebrated the constitution day a
that. it is andrew jackson. and first of all, how often did you look for the little story at the beginning that -- frankly, a lot of them i never heard. >> if you didn't hear of them i'm very impressed. we did. and i cap say that i was the one personally going through the archives and doing it. it was one of the decisions i made to try to make it as non historical as possible, to make it as journalistic as possible. and it is -- device we use in journalism to find the little nugget, the little anecdote that gives -- reveals something about the guy's character. it is a device you use in journalism, lead little. lead with some little wonderful nugget, anecdote, that gives you an insight ask draws the reader in. and we begin in the case of andrew jackson with a story of him in a duel, dean fending his wife's honor at which he had to do a number of times. before he -- went to the presidency. >> you say -- the fellow's name is charles dickinson who was 27 years old and had already killed 26 people in duels. who is his opponent if >> andrew jackson. >> what was -- what was the r
as failures or at least not very successful guys and that would be andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, a landing craft after the war was harassed them out of business. especially look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes views this giant failure during world war ii because he doesn't produce any weapons that work. he produces what reconnaissance airplanes. since the whole point. people like howard hughes were necessary syndicated people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work, we know not to go there. we had this and other countries did not commit insisted she win every time or that's going to cause a problem down the line. it's no different than europe. the german miracle of economic reduction was in fact a faÇade supported by mass conscription but eliminated unemployment, but by 1934 and early 1935, germany's economy was showing back to its pre-hitler status. only imposition of tariffs on eastern europe, which had no other trading partners and the acquisition o
successful guys, and that would be ann true jackson -- andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, landing craft, but after the war was kind of harassed out of business. but especially we look at people like howard hughes. how'd houston was this giant -- howard hughes was this giant failure in world war ii. he produces these wooden reconnaissance airplanes very fast, but they aren't really in use before the end of the war. misses the whole point. people like howard hughes were necessary so that we could have people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work, you know not to go there. and so it's because we have this and other countries did not, they insisted that you win every time or you die, that's going to cause a problem down the line. it's no different than europe. the german miracle of economic production was, in fact, a facade supported by mass conscription that eliminated unemployment. but by 1934 and early 1935, germany's economy was already rolling back to its pre-hitler st
, biography of andrew jackson called andrew jackson. the age of gold about the gold rush in the 1840s. the first american, about benjamin franklin and tea are about theodore roosevelt. together these books comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed
successful second term than their first word james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president's elected to a second term and the reason for those of experience failed or troubled second terms. four failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable war for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and. were the four. also four failed because of economic crisis or failure to act to deter such a crisis. jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt, the 37 downturn and george bush. eight who failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grant, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and george bush. two failed due to who boris. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferson, monroe, grand and cleveland. the dominant force of failure for a second term presidents has been there in the ability to successfully to work with congress. lee eight second term presidents have face trouble their second term due directly to the fight between congress and the white house. havi
, and you could always get a picture with him. and there were others. jesse jackson's a terrific subject, and some of the others. we had a lot of fun along the way. and others, of course, are more difficult. >> who is the most difficult? >> well, pat robertson wasn't the easiest person in the world to photograph. and i think the reason for that is simple. he's a gentleman who makes his living on television, and is very aware of the camera, and very aware of camera angles, and how he looks. and therefore, he has his guard up at all times. and when you look at pictures of him in the book, you can see that. he just notices where the camera is all the time because he's been trained, and that's how he makes a living. that's his profession. where the other candidates don't come from television. >> one thing inside this book on the flap that seems a little higher than most, and that's the price. how much does it cost for this? and i don't mean higher than most photographic books, i mean higher than most books. how much is this on the news stand? >> the soft cover -- you've got the hard cover. m
is worse than the crime she couldn't contemplate arthur would be executed. he and jackson were on lives of the clock keeps ticking. >> otb cytometry and four to discuss his book, "the coming prosperity." or fessler are spoiled was in attendance at the book festival held at the annually. >> joining us at george mason gears professor philip auerswald, his most recent book is this, shrink three. here's the cover of the book. what role does fear play in development? >> well, that's a great question. they don't talk about what role does fear play in our conversation about development, so when we talk about our reality to share our ideas in the marketplace can we compete with other atheists only know three things about marketplace ideas. short-term sells better than long-term. fear sells better than hope that negative sells better than positive and exaggerated sells better than moderated. so we see a disproportionate number of short-term narratives of negative exaggerated stories essentially. so short-term, negative can exaggerated. there's good reasons for that we are creatures that grouping
in the first election. andrew jackson won more popular votes than he did but jefferson didn't have a majority in congress. so, they -- the presidential race was thrown into the house of representatives and the probability of john quincy adams despised jackson and was terrified of the possibility of the presidency he said jefferson was a barbarian who could hardly run his name and so he got together with henry clay who had the votes in the presidential election and promised him to be the secretary of state and they pull their votes together in the house of representatives and that's how he was elected to the presidency. in the next election by then, jackson had gone around the country dillinger popular maturities and getting along changed from state to state to state and which providing for the universal right male suffrage which took the votes out of the hands of property owners and gave it to the barbarians as john quincy adams might say. >> john quincy adams deal with clay and 1824 was that ethical by the standards of those days retrospectively by our standards? >> is certainly was in those
. these are unconstitutional. jackson state university university, and no student show not threaten offend or degrade dined any own operated property the. >> every one of view is guilty of doing this there was a code that included the definition of harassment inappropriate directed laughter. [laughter] where did you direct that? again everybody is violating that but i do seal the fare at -- the parallels are strong and the gulf coast university this expressions deemed inappropriate. please do check out the buck. and there is more whacky political crisis -- cases was the one in indiana he was publicly reading a book and accused of public harassment. it was notre dame and eight -- against the klan and celebrates the defeat the because and had the picture of rally related to the defeat he was found guilty of racial harassment because it made somebody comfortable. he said no. it is the anti-klan book. that is all that mattered. it also applies to the flat out political speech. with houston state university they were made to terror down. and then of course, the phenomenon of free speech zones. and to restrict freed
blow to the confederacy. coming almost a year to the day after stone wall jackson's death. when he was president, grant once told the congressman that sheraton had no superior as a general living or dead and possibly know call. sheraton said grant was capable more than general ship he could manage a territory as lang as any two nations can cover in a war. but sheraton would never have risen so high nor have citiesover counties named after him without creeder creek. the circle in washington depicts sheraton of the touring war house. in the act of realing his army at -- and no command the new army of the shenandoah. sheraton's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5", and only 115 pounds in 1864. but it's grant memorable replied to one officer who commented on sheraton diminutive statute, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheraton's appointment, confederate general and 14,000 troops had marched down the shenandoah valley across the plateau mick to washington. it was a shock. capital was thrown to a panic. grant r
that happened to discourse and relations but to black people suddenly and -- justice jackson and all sharpener not the sole spokesperson certainly those policies of welfare reform law and order they have been demagogue when nixon says law-and-order we know what he talks about. those were reagan and bush and rudy guiliani bless his soul tens of thousands of black lives were saved when will fare was one of the reform to blacks of lives were saved in a different way law-and-order was so saved and bill clinton took credit for both. [laughter] and we have 12 years of paradise where i describe the many wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on eggshells is a more. people had to be worried you would innocently say a word then you would ruin your career, you'd be hated by all of humankind. that was after over at o.j.. changes are subtle but it was wonderful for race relations in america. and happened along time ago then comes the most liberal candidate as barack obama it is the two for. a liberal president and his critics by:the reese's. and now with the bombing it comes back. we're wa
, but it was a wonderful thing that happened to black people. suddenly sharpson and jackson were not the sole black spokesman. republican policies that have been being pushed by republicans for years, welfare reform, law and order policies, demagogued as racist, racist, racist, and when nixon says "law and order" we know what he's talking about. no law and order policies instituted by reagan and bush judges, rudy guiliani, bless his souls, tens of thousands of black lives were saved. when welfare was reformed, black lives were saved in a different way. welfare and law and order were so successful, bill clinton claimed credit for both. [laughter] we had 12 years of paradise, that's in the chapter, post-oj pair dice describing wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on egg shells anymore with the list of words you just mentioned. people had to be worried back then you would innocently say a word that would be deemed racist. you would ruin your career. you would be -- you would be hated by all of human kind. that was over after oj. a lot of the change after oj was really very subtle, bu
to the day after stonewall jackson's death. grant's confidence in sheridan was reported by sheridan's battlefield victories and his impressive postwar achievements. when he was president, grant once told the congressmen that sheridan had no superior as a general, living or dead, and possibly no equal. sheridan, said grant, was capable more than generalship. he could manage a territory as large as any two nations can cover any war. but sheridan was never written so high nor would have cities and counties named after him without cedar creek. a statue in sheridan circle in washington depicts sheridan on his towering warhorse in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's d
, two guys viewed as failures or at least not very successful guys had that would be andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, but after the war was harassed out of business. especially look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes fused his giant failure during world war ii because he doesn't produce any weapons that were. he produces these wooden reconnaissance airplanes very fast, but they aren't used before the end of the war. this is the whole point. people like howard hughes were necessary so we could have people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work, you know not to go the good it is because we had this in other countries did not come against the cd went every time or you die. that's going to cause a problem down the line. it is no different than your. the german miracle of economic reduction was in fact a faÇade supported by mass conscription that eliminated unemployment. in 1834 and early 1935, germany's economy was very willing that was pre-hitler's database
these are unconstitutional and not even a close call but jackson state university in jacksonville alabama, state university, no student shall threaten or degrade anyone on the university owned or operated property. anyone on the university property. every one of you is guilty of doing this at some point. sorry. at least able to be accused of doing this. at drexel university in philadelphia until they got the help of a student movement that included in its definition of harassment inconsiderate jokes and inappropriately directed laughter. [laughter] uh oh where did you direct that? so again everybody is guilty of this and you were going to leave it to administrators to enforce this. i do feel like the parallels between the campus speech codes and the victorian era are very strong and the gulf coast university simply has banned, quote on "expressions deemed inappropriate. just amazing. and i could go on and i do go on at great length about this. but do check out the book. then it comes more to the wacky political cases, one of the most classic ones and best known cases but nonetheless still well known as the
, natalie mains, peter jackson, my wife quitting heard job dedicating herself full-time one dozen attorneys, god knows how much money to change one case. 18 years. imagine what it would take to fight the system. it is like a giant machine. you cannot fight it. you can just do what we're doing right now. >> host: that sounds pretty bleak. >> i try what i can on a case-by-case basis of anyone interested if he went to hear about another case start with tim howard who was still on death row, and it is a man and arkansas is still trying to execute but few are interested maybe getting involved start with tim howard. >> we will start with audience questions. there is a couple of microphones. where do you go from here? you will continue to guess the word out on the book and the documentary but you move from new york city recently to sailor massachusetts ironically. [laughter] what do see your life like in salem massachusetts? >> whenever we don't have to keep pushing the case like this and not dedicate all of our time to get out of of legal tango of a bike to have a small meditation center were i
and with his help he ascended the jobs in the yet penetration of andrew jackson. first he helped him become the u.s. attorney general, then the secretary of the treasury and then in 1836 the chief justice of the supreme court. he went on to write the dred scott decision in 1857 which effectively legalized slavery and he's in the coming of the civil war so they were inseparable political figures in this period and influential and important in a way that is totally forgotten. in washington there is a bridge that crosses the potomac river in the park where he used to live and in the park there's lots of exhibits that are devoted to him and there is one that says he was active in antislavery causes and this is wrong, completely wrong. it would be more active to say that he was active in suppressing the antislavery causes. part of the point of the book is to remind people of things we really don't want to remember about our own history so this is also a book about the real francis scott key but i don't want to give the wrong impression. this book is not a polemical book or out to score points. i
. there are books and biographies of frank roosevelt, a biography about andrew jackson. the age of gold is about the american gold rush in the 1840sn the first american, benjamin franklin and together, thesethee books, i think, they comprise not haphazardly but very purposefully the history of thes united states through the lastrl 200 or so years two of them are finalists finalist for the pulitzer prize. youfi can see h.w. brand on tv all the time. bill grams.. history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. ldis book s -- i this book is, i'm going to holdo up it up against you can see it and recognize it. a it is a tremendous biography of ulysses-esque rant filled with stuff that i never knew and was delighted to find out. utry authoritative and readableo before we get to that, before we get to grant himself, i wanted to ask bill a more broad a question abouts biography. here at the book festival, there are a number of biographers. i have read several of thesehese books lately i have read robert caro's biography and all of cohen, these people are at the book festival, among others, i thinkh th
andrew jackson and 32 to be reelected with a smaller share of the popular vote than the first time. let's bring in the audience, there in the back. >> concerned scientist. thanks for this panel. i want to pay that off as something you are saying about science-based reality and we saw the october surprise in this campaign was the super storm sandy not only suspending the campaign immediate coverage for generating the endorsement -- bloomberg endorsement and on the other hand the republican party over the years, we have seen looking over the right shoulder and tear in tehran the primaries like bob english or my castle or dick lugar and a few of knowledge climate is real work across the aisle but this may not have registered yet. yesterday for the five members of congress republicans targeted went down in defeat. one of them dan benishek is still in the bubble and may or may not carry through but four out of five went down because they were targeted for taking taking the antiscience position. i'm wondering to questions 14 whit. and for stan is there an opening for the president -- my prese
, and he was marked by it. >> host: who is jimmy -- who was jimmy lee jackson who figures in your book? >> guest: yes. jimmy lee jackson was 26 years old and an activist with the voter registration drive in my hometown of marion. and, um, he was shot by a state trooper on the night of february 18, 1965, and eight days later he died. and it was his death that spurred the march from selma to montgomery. so most people know about that march, but today don't know it was jimmy lee jackson's death that brought it about. >> host: i want to show our viewers what the inside of your book looks like here, and it's done in graphic novel form. why? >> guest: yes. yes, i'm the illustrator as well as the author. art is my first love, and so this was the way to tell my story visually not only because of my art background, but also it was a way to incorporate some of the images of photography. that motif runs throughout the book. that's why it's called "darkroom." >> host: what do you do today for a living? >> guest: well, i am -- after spending four years writing and illustrating this book, it has ove
jackson series, read: time. at the end of the summer, jack was a bright guy, but was not a big reader and a good-looking kid -- his mother must be very, very pretty. but by the end of the summer, he had read a dozen books. about nine of them he liked a lot in his reading skills have gone to remove. so he went from eight yourself or he didn't like to read two when he took his sats, which they take, he got 800 reading, which is the highest score you can get. so that's what can happen. it's unimportant whether they get 800 or harvard or vanderbilt , the support they get through high school and they have options when they get out. so yeah, mitch, where are you? , now, we're going to shoot the breeze and awesome question. what happened with that movie, et cetera, et cetera. [applause] >> so i think you can also why we have a master storyteller a mischievous measure in the story that he tells. i think we need to create on this throughout the country. we read in our house. i think that is one of the most brilliant taglines that i've heard in a long, long time. don't you agree? i think we sho
think of what it took. it took johnny depp, natalie maines, peter jackson, it took my wife quitting her job and dedicating herself full time to this case, it took about a dozen attorneys, it took god knows how much money to change one case. eighteen years to change one case. so imagine what it would take to fight the system. you can't. you cannot -- the system is like a giant machine that's crushing people to death. and you can't fight it. the only thing you can do is, like kelly said, what we're doing right now. >> i have to say, that sounds pretty bleak. [laughter] >> it is. um, i guess the only thing, you know, i try to do what i can on a case-by-case basis, and i would just like to say tonight if anyone is interested in, um, learning about another case, maybe start with a friend of mine who is on death row in arkansas. his name was, his name is tim howard. he's still on death row right now. he's an innocent man. the state of arkansas is still trying to execute him. it would take forever to go into the details of the case, but if you are interested in learning about another case, may
in ray lewis is coming out you or if you're a cornerback and stephen jackson is heading towards you, what happens after you tackle one of those individuals in the sun accident? that is a necessary and foreseeable consequences of the recall playing football. the day that we actually turned the corner on making this game better for youth is the same day that we recognize that players, when they are engaged and get her to work, albert, not playing a game, i work, when we accept that responsibility can choose we're going to compensate them take care of medical injuries for those players who get her to her, that's the data will be much better for youth football because they will have moved beyond the gladiator phase i thought all, where we all used to say, think i got a broken leg itches happened and that was tough for him to which i should move on. >> let me finish a course that's why they call a workers compensation because it is work. my point is not necessarily workers compensation per se, but as a symbol for the cumulative impact of trauma from the youths. we talk about 180 million people
force base in alabama. and the u.s. army's basic combat training at fort jackson in south carolina. additionally, the team conferred figures responsible for u.s. navy and marine corps basic training. the one to express my deepest appreciation to general woodward and a team for a job extremely well done. the 22 findings and 46 recommendations of the report accurately reflect the deficiencies in her basic military training program to provide effect their proposals. i intend to implement 45 of the 46 recommendations. we distributed copies of the directives investigation as the lesser part i prepared for the secretary of the air force with my review of the corrective measures i'm putting in place. i do not intend to cover is a report in this afternoon as our time is limited and i want to be as responsive as possible to your questions. that said there are a few points i want to make you for opening the floor to you. first, when the senior leadership of education and training command became aware of the significant level of misconduct by military command structures were made for commitme
question. >> paul jackson, bergen record. >> could you tell me whether the disaster expiration of the expanded to more counties in new jersey today? >> we added on to more counties this morning and continue to work with governor christie todd impacts. a lot of areas as power outages can be the primary issue. will further cannot establish homes. the president added on somerset. as they continue to work this, will do further assessments to determine what's going to prominently divide will be homes damaged or destroyed, not just power outages and will also be looking at recovery costs another assistance that have not been declared yet. >> thank you, mr. chairman. operator, next question. >> good morning. i came in like, so i may be repeating something someone else asked. i want to know about adding additional counties in new york and also an explanation from your side of governor cuomo's request for 100% federal share. what would that be 100% of this congressional action needed for that? >> right now we have the boroughs impacted. again, as they assess damages, candidates can be a
are a say. coming almost a year to the day after stone wall jackson's death. grant's confidence was reward bid sheraton's battle field victory and the impressive post war achievement. when he was president, grant once told a congressman that sheraton had no superior as a general living or dead than possibly know call. sheraton said, grant, was capable more than general ship. he could manage a territory as any two nations can cover in a war. but sheraton would never risen so high nor would we have had city and counties named after him. [inaudible] circle in washington depicts sheraton the towering war house. the act of rallying the army at cedar creek green with age, statute conveyed the elect energy. lincoln and war secretary edwin stanton thought that 33-year-old sheraton too too young when he proposed in july that he command the new arm any of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grants memorable belie areply -- i think you'll find him big enough for the job. before ate -- appointment, th
of the vote declined as this county today, 45-56th overall first president since andrew jackson to be reelected in his first reelection, first elected president of the smaller share of the vote in his reelection. and, of course, at this point he was tied with george w. bush, although johnson, for the narrowest margin of victory ever for successfully reelected president all that tells us i think is that we are a very divided country to obama, demography gives democrats an opportunity to build a majority coalition that will have some legs. they have won the popular vote five of six election to the difficulty in holding white voters while in office is something i think is a real challenge in executing the opportunity that demographic change provides. i mean, two things are remarkable, that in many ways this campaign shows the weakness of both sides, that republicans are unable to win even 20% of minorities, and a sitting democratic president could not even 40% of whites. both parties are looking and structural challenges into the state to come and the chance that obama had still a
a european style social democracy or more towards the traditional conservative populism of jackson or his ronald reagan, and third. when they manage to deal with the deadlocks to change the direction or brick at such a deadlock as this it comes into the presidential leadership. it doesn't come into any other means. that need to be a good harbinger for your policy and how they are bred to move forward on terms of what to promote. so, given all of that if you buy into any of it, it is to what extent do you see any way in the world that the next four years are going to be anything other than a continuation of the last four struggling through, kicking the can down the road not dealing with the fundamental problems of america? >> three very good questions. i would say that obama's first term has two parts before and after the 2010 election just as the clinton administration was also two parts. as a talk about the last years and clinton when the republicans took the house and forced them to keep welfare reform and cut the capitol gains tax. they never talk about the first two years where the jo
democracy or more towards the traditional conservative populism of jackson or ronald reagan. third, when the country manages to deal with such a deadlock or change such a deadlock as this it doesn't come to any other means. so you have a lot of red and that may be a good harbinger for your party but it doesn't say anything about how the country is going to move forward in terms of what you promote. so given all of that if you buy any of it, to what extent do you see any way the next four years are going to be anything other than a continuation of the last struggling kicking the can down the road not really dealing with the fundamental problems in america? >> three very good questions. i would say that obama's first term has two parts before and after the 2012 election just as the clinton administration was also to parts. i talk about the last six years when they took the house and the senate and forced the welfare reform and cut the capitol gains tax. they never talk about the first two years where growth and jobs were flat when the democrats read everything. so i'm all in favor of a las
popular myth back in 1815. but in 1815 what people were really celebrating was the idea that jackson had gone to battle with this total rag tag mig shah, the kentucky boys, and they have -- militia, the kentucky boys, and that they had succeeded in overcoming earlier problems. yes. >> the american navy had some ip newspapers in the war of -- influence in the war of 1812, finally got established there, and i'm wondering if your theory on romantic passion had anything related to the navy, because i always thought sailors were more romantically passionate than -- [laughter] >> thank you so much. the question is, weren't the sailors even more romantic and passionate than the soldiers, and what about the navy in the war of 1812? thank you very much for the question. i actually have a whole chapter on sailors in the book. you have to kind of figure out what your -- what you're going to abstract, so i didn't even mention the sailors, but you are right. they're very much in the same kind of patriotic vein that we have been talking about. >> what was general hull's involvement in the american rev
cool books warrior series, percy jackson, the wrinkle in time by the end of the summer jack was bright but not a good reader.3 day. do i have to? yes. unless you want to sleep in a garage. but we will find cool books warrior series, percy jackson, the wrinkle in time by the end of the summer jack was bright but not a good reader. his mother must also be very pretty. he had read one dozen books and his reading skills had gone through the roof so eight years old the did not like to read when he took the s.a.t. he got 800 and reading which is the highest for. it is not important if they get 800 but it is important to get there high-school and that they have options. mitch? come on out. we will shoot the breeze. what happened with that move the? >> thank you. [applause] >> you can tell why we have a master storyteller just from hearing stories that he tells. we need to create this throughout the country. we read in our house that is one of the most brilliant tagline tsai have heard in a long time. don't you agree? [applause] we should begin that i read this cnn dot com peace the road to an
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